Nitin Soni


*
I was a man
She was a woman

Woman: Short, black
And burned...
Her eyes folded
Into footwear
And lips turned
Into holes.
Merely dots
In and around.

I was a man
She was a woman

She always
Licked
The dust
From my feet.

And I always sucked
The breasts
I had been provided
To feed.

I was a man
She was a woman.
Indeed

*
Farewell

In the grassy fields on a mundane evening night I go astray.
A gentle voice, a soft touch of the wind – “Would harmoniously betray!”
Thou, my beloved, would someday come, and I would courteously say…
Farewell!

Thou command I’d obey, lighting a lamp at her heart, and at night
Take off the garments I wear, give my soul and feelings to pray’r,
Adore my gorgeous lady, the air that I breathe, say…
Farewell!

The sun, beaming and burning…the love I have felt for you
All these years has given me “Hope” while I ponder at night,
Moon, shooting stars, Goddess of love, “Wish” and begging bow…
Farewell!

Lush green fields, pleasing wind, fruitful trees,
Melodious song of birds, Asian and European, and a bee vibrating my ears,
A cool mist, smelling optimism and a warming breeze…
Farewell!

Fool – wise preacher – scholar, adolescent – adult
Slave or servant, lover or hater of creation’s lord,
Whose sword is directed by the words of wisdom and judgement…
Farewell!

The books of love, always reminded me of you, rested at my chest filled with of diamond
The saga of love, magical ardours, they have told –
Unlike me, peace, pure love, affection they have sold…
Farewell!

Farewell to my hope, to creations and creatures,
To beloved, with love
To the world I cherished my entire life with…
Farewell! Farewell! Farewell!

*

I Remember

I’ll tell you something committed to my memory
Something known for novelty and humanity

A dirt-free road in the month of June, I remember
The streets of New Delhi and the busy life of Connaught place inner circle,
And red-green light of traffic signal, I remember…

An old American woman in a blue shawl with a camera in her right hand…
Grinning – and giving a one-hundred rupee note to a small innocent beggar
I remember…

I remember a bunch of beggars she captured in a camera
They followed her till she entered the Madras coffee house
Waving her hands and gesturing ‘goodbye!”
I remember…

It seemed a familiar scenario
The red signal welcomes the same beggars to beg
I remember; some of them were not more than six-years-old
And two or three children were newly born…

I walked on, silently, down the scorching road, and I remember
How the old man pulled down the window of his car
Flipped one rupee coin, and asked an innocent beggar to depart
I remember I called out the beggar twice…
She did not hear my first call, then
When I called out to her a second time…

“Do you like chocolate and ice cream?”
I remember her answer, “Anything that makes my stomach happy.”
I took her to a nearby restaurant
And asked the manager to feed her like a queen!
I remember her smiling face…

All I can remember the next day when I visited the place again
She, Sonam, warning a muddy frock and begging with an empty plate

I remember I clicked a picture of her from far
Tears began rolling down and I wished to leave…
The silence of road being more dangerous than the silence of war

That’s all I can remember!
That’s all I want to remember!

*

Silence

I live silence
In between the legs
of virgin sentences

The legs often whisper
The melody
To win over the divine
Land

And I keep quiet
Like a face of ten years old girl
With a stabbed grin.


*
Prostitute Mother

I knew she sells her body
And - shuts the door
To his lustful desire -
Always present
And naked on the floor.

I have known her
From a newly born baby
To an old dying, defeated
Boat...

She takes off her shame
When in the service of
A new master...

In the other bed
She performs her duty
To make children sleep
Peacefully.

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